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C207 E350 CDI just stopped!

Discussion in 'Electrics, Vacuum, Ignition and ECU' started by quinnj3, Feb 19, 2019.

  1. Wighty

    Wighty Senior Member

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    Your Mercedes:
    W211/E320cdi/2009 and CLK200k 2009
    I'm pretty sure it's fuse F44 , 15 amp which is in the fuse box by the brake fluid reservoir in the engine bay
     
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  2. OP
    quinnj3

    quinnj3 Senior Member

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    Your Mercedes:
    2010 E350 CDI BlueEfficiency Sport Coupe Auto 227bhp
    This was the fault. Some oil had leaked onto the shutoff valve motor creating a short circuit. Mechanic cleaned it up and replaced fuse with 25A (which I don’t agree with). Car is running for now at least. Thanks for help guys.


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  3. mattkh

    mattkh Senior Member

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    W168 1999 1.6
    But oil is not supposed to conduct electricity according to our well-missed 'television' member.
     
  4. OP
    quinnj3

    quinnj3 Senior Member

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    This man is correct - for pure clean oil. However it takes very little to make it conductive.

    The shut off motor was also a bit sticky which is more likely the culprit tbh.


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  5. RhodiBill

    RhodiBill Senior Member

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    Your Mercedes:
    Mercedes 2003 w203 C180K-SE Sports Coupe.
    Oil is conductive.

    I remember when I worked on the Gold Mines in the Free State, (RSA) some of the equipment was fused using Oil Fuses.

    Not too sure. (long time ago) but I think it is because they can withstand big current at high voltages - 6.6kv in our instances - all I remember is that they were big things, about the size of a Coke tin!

    Another thing you should remember is that the rubber in car tyres is also conductive.....
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2019
  6. LostKiwi

    LostKiwi Senior Member

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    '93 500SL-32, '01 W210 Estate E240, 02 R230 SL500 (Malcolm Spec), 04 Smart Roadster Coupe
    Pure engine oil is not overly conductive (Television is correct there). The problem is that old engine oil (esp diesel engines) contain carbon (that's why it's black), water, metal particles etc and that can make it conductive. One method used to determine oil condition is to monitor conductivity - the more conductive the worse condition.

    Oil is regularly used as a coolant for transformers.
     
  7. RhodiBill

    RhodiBill Senior Member

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    So, if I filled a bowl with fresh Oil and electrified it you would quite happily put your hand in it??

    I know I wouldn't! :shock:
     
  8. LostKiwi

    LostKiwi Senior Member

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    If you had two electrodes in it (one live, one earth) then yes (assuming fresh engine oil).
     
  9. OP
    quinnj3

    quinnj3 Senior Member

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    This is going off topic a little but I work as an electrical engineer. In one of the quarries we do service work in there is an old oil based soft starter which needs to be wound by hand to accelerate the motor. It’s probably 50 years old and the thought of working at it scares me. The same place has old oil filled contractors as well. I’m surprised the outfit hasn’t been condemned as the electrics are shocking there.


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  10. Westheath

    Westheath Senior Member

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    Empty garage, awaiting new toy :)
    I see what you did there ................
     
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  11. OP
    quinnj3

    quinnj3 Senior Member

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    Your Mercedes:
    2010 E350 CDI BlueEfficiency Sport Coupe Auto 227bhp
    Ok back on topic.

    Just got an update from mechanic. The car is going into limp mode. The shut off motor must be faulty. If I go down the repair route the motor is approx £200 labour is £200 and the cold air inlet is £550 (which is cracked). I also need a lower control arm and rear brakes tidied for mot bringing a total spend to approx £1200. Ouch!

    My previous car was an Alfa 159 2.4 derv and it had leaking swirl flaps. Instead of replacing the manifold I removed the flaps and plugged them up. The car drove better than ever afterwards. This seems to be a common issue with all derv engines.

    I’m considering using a resistor to fool the ecu into thinking the flap motor is connected and just disconnect the motor completely without having to remove it. I can then replace the motor myself at a time that suits. I’m also considering plastic welding the inlet duct as £550 for a piece of plastic is taking the mick big style.

    I know this has been done on E320 but I haven’t come across it on the newer E350. Does anyone have any experience of this?


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  12. Westheath

    Westheath Senior Member

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    Empty garage, awaiting new toy :)
    Book it in for a MB Star session with a competent operator and have it diagnosed properly.
     
  13. OP
    quinnj3

    quinnj3 Senior Member

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    2010 E350 CDI BlueEfficiency Sport Coupe Auto 227bhp
    Ok, I’ve collected my car from mechanics. He doesn’t have the time for a couple of weeks to fit the swirl flap motor. I have already bought the parts required from Mercedes to be fitted. My own garage will be completed now in a couple of weeks so I’ll probably fit this myself.

    In the interim I have taken a resistance measurement from the new motor and installed a similar size resistor between the pwm and power connections on the plug in the car. This has allowed the car to be fooled into thinking the flaps are operational and for the fault to be reset. The car is working normally except for some loss of power at the top end. I’m not sure what’s causing this but can only assume it’s because the shut off ports may be closed. I’ll take another look at the weekend and experiment with a couple of different size resistors. Currently I have a 1.5kohm fitted as that’s what the swirl motor was reading but other people are using a 4.7kohm resistor. Maybe this gives a different reading to the car to adjust fuelling at the top end?


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  14. OP
    quinnj3

    quinnj3 Senior Member

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    Your Mercedes:
    2010 E350 CDI BlueEfficiency Sport Coupe Auto 227bhp
    Just to cap this thread:

    Yesterday I completed the install of the inlet port servo motor. The old one was jammed solid, probably the gearing that failed causing an over current event to blow the fuse. On the positive side both inlet bank slides / flaps were smooth and free moving meaning I didn’t have to replaced the inlet manifolds. After a complete degrease and installation of the new motor and air inlet bungs I took the chance to do an oil service even though I last done one in November or 6k miles ago. The old oil was still clean (for a derv) with no sludge.

    A short 6 mile run to get the oil around the car has shown the engine to be back to full power and actually a little smoother. I suspect the lack of high rev power was due the servo being jammed in the closed position. The auto box is now also a lot smoother.

    PS. If anyone is doing this diy as I did, in principle it’s a relatively straightforward repair with just a handful of nuts and bolts however those nuts and bolts are anything but easy to get to especially behind the turbo. Just 2 x bolts took a few hours of head scratching and trial and error to find a method to reach them and apply enough torque to release. One of them took a combination of 2 x universal joints and 2 x extensions to release. Reassembly was more straightforward.


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  15. peterws1957

    peterws1957 Senior Member

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    Your Mercedes:
    sl350 /2004/3.7 and CL65/2009/6.0
    Good bit of work there!
     
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