CLK Boot Lock Issues - Solution 200 Compressor Convertible

Sheffield_CLK

New Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
2
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0
Location
Sheffield, South Yorkshire England
Your Mercedes
CLK 2000 2.0l
Hi all, I've searched high and low for a solution to what seems to be a common issue with Mercedes CLK boot locks.

I bought my CLK Convertible 200 Compressor (yr 2000) in February 2016 with a view to driving across Europe to a wedding in Italy in May. A week or so after getting the car home I started to have problems with the boot not opening either by the centre console switch, the fob or the key (fat chance there).

Here's my ULTIMATE solution - hold tight it gets nasty - but definitely works, it is invisible and provides an emergency access.

I tried thinking you could take the rear seat out and access the boot - you can't, there's a large steel box structure that holds the soft-top pump which you can't get past, around or through. Thought I might be able to get to the lock from the inside. You can't
I tried looking for blown fuse(s) - no all ok.
I tried massaging the key with WD40, Copper-slip, Lithium grease, 3-in-1 penetrating oil. No Joy. Soaking it for days, coming back to it.
I tried applying weight to the boot lid - with the theory that the lock might be under some pressure keeping it from opening (More on that later).
I didn't fancy drilling or smashing the lock out, or drilling at the side of the lock to try to get to the microswitch.

Here goes (see attached photos for reference). - Cut the boot open BUT making it look like you haven't. Here's the steps I did.
1. Using masking tape, tape around the number plate on the body of the boot
2. Remove the number plate.
3. Then apply more tape inside the first line of tape to create a wide band which also covers the screw holes for the number plate.
4. Now mask off all the boot area with paper and/or clothes just like you are going to spray the small rectangle you've taped behind the number plate. This is to protect your body and paintwork.
5. (Deep Breath) Now use an angle grinder with a thin cutting blade or ideally a dremmel to cut a slot top to bottom in the very centre of the exposed area.
6. Then cut left to right (vice versa) at the top and bottom of the unmasked area.
7. DO NOT cut too deep - stay shallow - but you are unlikely to hit anything. This was my main fear.
8. I DIDN'T use my plasma cutter - do to the risk of fire or more damage - I did't know if I'd hit a cable, or more structural parts of boot lid.
9. Now you should have slot in the middle, and two slots at the top and bottom running left to right.
10. Peel back both flaps - gently and not too far. Just enough to get your hand or fingers in. (WARNING SHARP EDGES)
11. If you've taped up like I've mentioned you're unlikely to hit anything and you should have an opening just above the barrel. To the left of the lock barrel there is a white piece of plastic with a spring and a rod going down to the lock.
12. Press the white piece of plastic down - the boot will open.
13. Now peel off all the tape and masking, and coverings. and bend the flaps back into position - as flat as you can.
14. Clean everything up and tape (gaffer, gorilla, insulation tape) along the cuts.
15. Replace the number plate - Nothing is visible.

This is radical - but I wonder how many CLKs have a similar solution already in place, but you don't know about it.

HERE'S what (I think) was causing my boot - once the boot was open there was a relatively large stone in the lock mechanism recess in the corner. I think it came from some rubbish and tools I'd put in the boot. Once I'd cleaned the lock recess my boot hasn't failed to open since. Fob works, centre console switch and push lock all work. My key is still rubbish and fails to work properly. But I think that's down to lack of use over the years - the barrel gets water in it and corrodes.

The advantages of this solution.
If you carry a screwdriver and at any point should the boot fail to open and you really need it to.
Remove the number plate - pull back the flaps, press the button. Replace the number plate.
I saw this as an emergency access whilst I went to Europe.
I'd planned to add a second switch to override everything but haven't needed to.

Please see the photos - I wasn't sure what was behind the panel - I couldn't find any photos.
These should help you see what's there.
 

Attachments

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  • Photo 3 - Cutting - SAM_1591.jpg
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  • Photo 4 - Cutting - SAM_1593.jpg
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  • Photo 7 - Switch -SAM_1599.jpg
    Photo 7 - Switch -SAM_1599.jpg
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mercedes13156

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2005
Messages
1,267
Reaction score
210
Location
West Lothian
Your Mercedes
CLK 200 Cabrio and a Ford Kuga
Excellent fix!

You can't do that on the W209 convertible because the boot lid is fibreglass. I needed to replace the plates and one screw just rotated in the hole. I managed to get it out but ended up damaging the edge of the screw hole which revealed the fibreglass.
 

golfcarmad

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2006
Messages
54
Reaction score
0
Location
Wallasey Wirral
Your Mercedes
S320 57 plate wow wow also c320 clk convertible
Thanks thanks n more thanks

Tried yr drastic solution this morning-it works all back n working-thank you so much:p
 

SteveF10

New Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Your Mercedes
CLK Kompressor/2007/2000
Hi all, I've searched high and low for a solution to what seems to be a common issue with Mercedes CLK boot locks.

Hi
I have exactly the same problem as what you have describedm, no access to boot and Soft-top not working. the problem I have is that My model is A209. The problem I have is that the Lock mechanisim is not flat on the boot panel but under the ridge. I am not sure if I can still access the lock if I was to cut a slot.
 

Oakesy320

New Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2013
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Location
Blackpool lancs
Your Mercedes
2000 320 clk conv
Hi all, I've searched high and low for a solution to what seems to be a common issue with Mercedes CLK boot locks.

I bought my CLK Convertible 200 Compressor (yr 2000) in February 2016 with a view to driving across Europe to a wedding in Italy in May. A week or so after getting the car home I started to have problems with the boot not opening either by the centre console switch, the fob or the key (fat chance there).

Here's my ULTIMATE solution - hold tight it gets nasty - but definitely works, it is invisible and provides an emergency access.

I tried thinking you could take the rear seat out and access the boot - you can't, there's a large steel box structure that holds the soft-top pump which you can't get past, around or through. Thought I might be able to get to the lock from the inside. You can't
I tried looking for blown fuse(s) - no all ok.
I tried massaging the key with WD40, Copper-slip, Lithium grease, 3-in-1 penetrating oil. No Joy. Soaking it for days, coming back to it.
I tried applying weight to the boot lid - with the theory that the lock might be under some pressure keeping it from opening (More on that later).
I didn't fancy drilling or smashing the lock out, or drilling at the side of the lock to try to get to the microswitch.

Here goes (see attached photos for reference). - Cut the boot open BUT making it look like you haven't. Here's the steps I did.
1. Using masking tape, tape around the number plate on the body of the boot
2. Remove the number plate.
3. Then apply more tape inside the first line of tape to create a wide band which also covers the screw holes for the number plate.
4. Now mask off all the boot area with paper and/or clothes just like you are going to spray the small rectangle you've taped behind the number plate. This is to protect your body and paintwork.
5. (Deep Breath) Now use an angle grinder with a thin cutting blade or ideally a dremmel to cut a slot top to bottom in the very centre of the exposed area.
6. Then cut left to right (vice versa) at the top and bottom of the unmasked area.
7. DO NOT cut too deep - stay shallow - but you are unlikely to hit anything. This was my main fear.
8. I DIDN'T use my plasma cutter - do to the risk of fire or more damage - I did't know if I'd hit a cable, or more structural parts of boot lid.
9. Now you should have slot in the middle, and two slots at the top and bottom running left to right.
10. Peel back both flaps - gently and not too far. Just enough to get your hand or fingers in. (WARNING SHARP EDGES)
11. If you've taped up like I've mentioned you're unlikely to hit anything and you should have an opening just above the barrel. To the left of the lock barrel there is a white piece of plastic with a spring and a rod going down to the lock.
12. Press the white piece of plastic down - the boot will open.
13. Now peel off all the tape and masking, and coverings. and bend the flaps back into position - as flat as you can.
14. Clean everything up and tape (gaffer, gorilla, insulation tape) along the cuts.
15. Replace the number plate - Nothing is visible.

This is radical - but I wonder how many CLKs have a similar solution already in place, but you don't know about it.

HERE'S what (I think) was causing my boot - once the boot was open there was a relatively large stone in the lock mechanism recess in the corner. I think it came from some rubbish and tools I'd put in the boot. Once I'd cleaned the lock recess my boot hasn't failed to open since. Fob works, centre console switch and push lock all work. My key is still rubbish and fails to work properly. But I think that's down to lack of use over the years - the barrel gets water in it and corrodes.

The advantages of this solution.
If you carry a screwdriver and at any point should the boot fail to open and you really need it to.
Remove the number plate - pull back the flaps, press the button. Replace the number plate.
I saw this as an emergency access whilst I went to Europe.
I'd planned to add a second switch to override everything but haven't needed to.

Please see the photos - I wasn't sure what was behind the panel - I couldn't find any photos.
These should help you see what's there.
Thanks for the help I did similar but used a 25 mm hole saw and accessed the lock via the amiable hole I created which is behind the number plate now will put a rubber grommet in the hole and take photos,
 

Jaynuts

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
5
Your Mercedes
02 200 clk kompressor convertable
Thanks for the help I did similar but used a 25 mm hole saw and accessed the lock via the amiable hole I created which is behind the number plate now will put a rubber grommet in the hole and take photos,
Please show photos I've similar issues now , would like to see how you completed this , thanks
 

Jaynuts

Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
5
Your Mercedes
02 200 clk kompressor convertable
Please show photos I've similar issues now , would like to see how you completed this , thanks
Sorted myself drilled 10 mm hole and released boot catch ....
 

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